Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Roofing
Common Product
MasterFormat 07 57 00 Coated Foamed Roofing; 07 57 13 Sprayed Polyurethane Foam Roofing

This information reflects our best understanding of product composition in 2021.

Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is a site-applied foam insulation material that comes in a range of types and densities. The CP considers a rigid, closed cell spray foam of about 3 pounds per cubic foot density that can be used for exterior flat or...

More about Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Roofing

Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is a site-applied foam insulation material that comes in a range of types and densities. The CP considers a rigid, closed cell spray foam of about 3 pounds per cubic foot density that can be used for exterior flat or low-slope roofing. These products can be used in new construction or re-roofing applications for commercial, residential, or industrial construction and create a seemless roofing material. The insulation can be installed directly to the roof deck over a number of roof substrates including metal, plywood, concrete, built up roofing, modified bitumen, or single-ply roofing membranes. A primer may be required in some cases. Primers may be acrylic, epoxy, or alkyd materials. SPF application requires that both air and substrate temperatures are between 50°F - 120°F, with a relative humidity less than 85%. It is should also be noted that depending on temperature, particular grades of SPF with different reactivites are required. Furthermore, within 24 hours of installation UV coatings must be applied in order to prevent degradation of the SPF. Coatings can be silicone, acrylic, polyurethane, or butyl rubber. Granules can also optionally be applied for increased durability. Accessories used with spray foam roofing are outside of the scope of this CP and may add additional hazards. 

SPF is a two-part polyurethane based foam comprised of a isocyanate part (the A side) and a polyol part (the B side) that are combined and reacted on site as applied. The B side of SPF also contains blowing agents, flame retardants, catalysts, and surfactants. Closed cell foams, such as those used for roofing applications, typically use fluorocarbon blowing agents, including hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) with a high global warming potential (GWP), or hydroluoroolefins (HFOs) which are newer low global warming potential alternatives. While HFOs do not themselves have high GWP, they do use high GWP and/or ozone depleting substances in the manufacturing process. U.S. EPA regulations that would have prohibited the use of HFCs in SPF insulation by 2020 were partially overturned in Federal court rulings, so manufacturers already using HFCs are allowed to continue using them. Several U.S. states have moved forward with their own bans on HFCs in SPF, many of which have gone into effect(Theodoridi, 2020). Most spray foam insulation manufacturers continue to offer their HFC versions of SPF, even as many have introduced an HFO version. Because HFC versions are allowed in most states in the US and most manufacturers offer both types, this CP covers spray foam roofing made with an HFC blowing agent. Formulations that instead use HFOs appear to be similiar. See the All Contents tab for contents found in both HFC and HFO versions. 

Since SPF products are reacted and applied on site, special care must be taken to avoid exposure to the isocyanates, amines, flame retardants, etc. for workers and others who may be present during the application process. Many SPF applicators undergo training and professional certification. Even for exterior applications like roofing, personal protective equipement typically includes full body protection in the form of disposable coveralls, chemical-resistant gloves, and eye and face protection as well as supplied air respirators or NIOSH-approved air purifying respirators. Care must be taken to prevent mists or vapors from entering the building air intake for the ventilation system (typically done by turning off the building ventilation system and applying plastic sheeting securely over the air intake) and also to protect surroundings from overspray.

Name % Wt Whole Function GS Score Sources
Polymethylene polyphenyl isocyanate
9016-87-9
28.76% Polymer Subscribe to view
4,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
101-68-8
19.87% Monomer Subscribe to view
2,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
5873-54-1
2.61% Monomer Subscribe to view
ETHYLENE OXIDE, 2,2'-IMINODIETHANOL, PROPYLENE OXIDE POLYMER
34354-45-5
13.62% Polyol Subscribe to view
Oxirane, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, ether with 2,6-bis[[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]methyl]-4-branched
940912-28-7
10.90% Polyol Subscribe to view
1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-dimethyl ester, manuf. of, by-products from, polymers with diethylene glycol
70749-97-2
10.90% Polyol Subscribe to view
HFC 245fa
460-73-1
3.54% Blowing agent Subscribe to view
Tri-(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate
13674-84-5
2.88% Flame retardant Subscribe to view
Diethylene glycol
111-46-6
2.21% Monomer Subscribe to view
Triethyl phosphate
78-40-0
1.77% Flame retardant Subscribe to view
Water
7732-18-5
0.89% Blowing agent Subscribe to view
Silicone L-5310
87244-72-2
0.44% Surfactant Subscribe to view
Bis (2-dimethylaminoethyl) ether
3033-62-3
0.44% Catalyst Subscribe to view
Deanol
108-01-0
0.44% Initiator Subscribe to view
Ethylene glycol
107-21-1
0.44% Monomer Subscribe to view
Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, bismuth(3+) salt (3:1)
67874-71-9
0.18% Catalyst Subscribe to view
2-Ethylhexanoic acid
149-57-5
0.08% Catalyst Subscribe to view
1,4-Dioxane
123-91-1
0.01% Residual Subscribe to view
Formaldehyde
50-00-0
<0.01% Residual Subscribe to view
Name % Wt Part % Wt Whole Function GS Score Sources
A Side
51.25% 51.25% Polymer/ Monomer Subscribe to view  
Polymethylene polyphenyl isocyanate
9016-87-9
56.12% 28.76% Polymer Subscribe to view
4,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
101-68-8
38.78% 19.87% Monomer Subscribe to view
2,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
5873-54-1
5.10% 2.61% Monomer Subscribe to view
B-Side (Spray Foam Roofing)
48.75% 48.75% Various Subscribe to view  
ETHYLENE OXIDE, 2,2'-IMINODIETHANOL, PROPYLENE OXIDE POLYMER
34354-45-5
27.94% 13.62% Polyol Subscribe to view
Oxirane, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, ether with 2,6-bis[[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]methyl]-4-branched
940912-28-7
22.35% 10.90% Polyol Subscribe to view
1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-dimethyl ester, manuf. of, by-products from, polymers with diethylene glycol
70749-97-2
22.35% 10.90% Polyol Subscribe to view
HFC 245fa
460-73-1
7.26% 3.54% Blowing agent Subscribe to view
Tri-(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate
13674-84-5
5.90% 2.88% Flame retardant Subscribe to view
Diethylene glycol
111-46-6
4.54% 2.21% Monomer Subscribe to view
Triethyl phosphate
78-40-0
3.63% 1.77% Flame retardant Subscribe to view
Water
7732-18-5
1.82% 0.89% Blowing agent Subscribe to view
Silicone L-5310
87244-72-2
0.91% 0.44% Surfactant Subscribe to view
Bis (2-dimethylaminoethyl) ether
3033-62-3
0.91% 0.44% Catalyst Subscribe to view
Deanol
108-01-0
0.91% 0.44% Initiator Subscribe to view
Ethylene glycol
107-21-1
0.91% 0.44% Monomer Subscribe to view
Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, bismuth(3+) salt (3:1)
67874-71-9
0.36% 0.18% Catalyst Subscribe to view
2-Ethylhexanoic acid
149-57-5
0.17% 0.08% Catalyst Subscribe to view
1,4-Dioxane
123-91-1
0.03% 0.01% Residual Subscribe to view
Formaldehyde
50-00-0
0.01% <0.01% Residual Subscribe to view

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Known or Potential Residuals
Known or Potential Residuals for Chemical
CASRN NAME GS SCORE TYPE FREQUENCY % WT CHEM % WT PRODUCT SOURCE
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Other Process Chemicals
CASRN NAME GS Score TYPE FREQUENCY % WT CHEM % WT PRODUCT SOURCES
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HBN Resources (8)
HBN Resources for Product
TYPE TITLE
Report Asthmagens in Building Materials: The Problem & Solutions
Report Making Affordable Multifamily Housing More Energy Efficient: A Guide to Healthier Upgrade Materials
Tool HBN's Transformation Targets: A Framework for Driving Market Change
Article Does Healthy SPF Exist?
Article Careful Insulation Selection and Installation Can Protect R-Value and Health
Specification Guidance for Specifying Healthier Insulation and Air-Sealing Materials
Course HomeFree Online Course: Selecting Healthier Insulation with HomeFree
Article "When is it "green"? Preventing the Toxic Effects of Spray Foam Insulation”
Sources
Sources for Common Product Data
Source Uploaded Document Linked Document
Center for the Polyurethanes Industry
Corbond A SDS
Envelo-Seal 2.7 - TDS
Envelo-Seal 2.7 B Component - SDS
Environment Canada Screening Assessment - CAS 88-12-0
Exterior SPF Insulation Guidance Document
Foam-Gard Quick Spec
Foamlok 3000 4G - SDS
Foamlok LPA 3000 - SDS
Foamlok LPA 3000 - TDS
Foamsulate A SDS
Gaco A SDS
GacoRoofFoam - TDS
GacoRoofFoam Component B - SDS
GacoRoofFoam Component B Low GWP - SDS
Introduction to SPF - SPFA and PHRC
MD-C-200 A SDS
Natural-Therm 3.0 PCF - SDS
Natural-Therm 3.0 PCF - TDS
NCFI - A SDS
NCFI 10-011 - SDS
NCFI 10-011 - TDS
NCFI Board Feet
Niax MC-810 SDS
Niax Polyurethane Additives Guide
Overview of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF)
Patent US20180030245A1
Permax - A Component HPD
Permax - A SDS
Permax 3.0 HFO - B Component HPD
Permax 3.0 HFO - B Component SDS
Permax 3.0 HFO TDS
PremiR+ 70 - SDS
Premiseal 70 - SDS
Premiseal 70 - TDS
Premiseal A Component - SDS
Profoam Board Feet
SealTite Pro A SDS
Seven Important Points for Spray Polyurethane Foam Contractors
Silstab 2760 SDS
Skytite C1 3.0 - SDS
Skytite C1 3.0 - TDS
Sopra SPF A SDS
Specialty Products - web
SPFA EPD - HFC
SPFA EPD - HFO
Spray Foam Roofing vs Insulation
Theodoridi
U.S. Appeals Court maintains ban on HFC replacements
Ultra-Thane HFC 230 - TDS